Frontoparietal stroke

When it comes to a stroke, it affects thousands of individuals all over the world every year. Once an individual is suspected of experiencing a stroke, it is vital to seek immediate medical care. A stroke involves an abrupt deprivation of blood to the brain due to blockage or rupture of a blood vessel in the brain. This results to diminished level of oxygen and essential nutrients to the affected region of the brain, thus affecting the functions such as walking. A frontoparietal stroke typically affects the frontal and parietal lobes of the brain.

What are the effects of a frontoparietal stroke?

The brain is comprised of three main regions – cerebellum, cerebrum and brain stem. The cerebrum is the biggest and highly developed advanced part of the brain. It has a left and right hemisphere and controls emotions, speech, fine movements, sensory stimuli as well as containing the parietal, frontal, occipital and temporal lobes. The frontal lobe is responsible for controlling problem solving skills, emotions and selective attention behavior. Injury to the frontal lobe can affect these functions. As for the left and right parietal lobes, they control sensations of pressure and touch.

Signs and symptoms

The indications of a stroke depend on the region of the brain involved. The symptoms might include numbness with weakness or paralysis on the affected side, headache, sudden unconsciousness, confusion, dizziness, vision impairment and lack of coordination.

A stroke in the right hemisphere of the cerebrum can affect the left side of the body while a stroke in the left hemisphere can affect the right side of the body. Any form of damage to the right parietal lobe can affect touch, vision, taste and sound. Injury to the left lobe disrupts with understanding of spoken or written language.

Frontoparietal stroke

The symptoms might include numbness with weakness or paralysis on the affected side, headache, sudden unconsciousness, confusion, dizziness, vision impairment and lack of coordination.

Treatment

The treatment typically includes a primary assessment in order to determine if the exact cause of the stroke is a blockage or bleeding. The individual should be stabilized and might require supportive measures to overcome acute issues such as hypertension, difficulty breathing and even dehydration. This is followed by steps to prevent and manage complications. A rehabilitation phase is started to promote optimum recovery of the individual. In addition, lifestyle changes are also recommended to prevent subsequent strokes in the future.

The warning indications of an ischemic stroke might be evident as early as 7 days before the event. In a study conducted, it was discovered that individuals usually experience transient ischemic attack (TIA) or mini strokes before an ischemic stroke that usually manifest within 7 days. Due to this, the timing and early treatment of a TIA is vital in order to prevent a major ischemic stroke.

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