How to handle a skin bleach burn

An individual can suffer from a chemical burn by simply spilling bleach on the skin. In case of severe burns, it is best to seek immediate medical care. Medical attention is also required if the individual shows signs of shock, experiences a bodily reaction, burn bigger than 3 inches in size that penetrates more than just the first layer and a burn sustained on the eyes, buttocks, feet, faces, groin or over a major joint.

If the individual has not received a tetanus shot within the past five years, it is best that the individual will receive one since all burns are prone to tetanus. The chemical burns caused by bleach that do not require medical attention still requires immediate treatment in order to minimize the amount of damage on the skin.

Flushing the affected area

The primary treatment for a bleach burn is to flush the bleach off the skin using cool running water. You have to continue this for about 20 minutes or more. Just make sure that you will remove any clothing or jewelry that has been contaminated before the flushing is performed. The burned area must be washed again if the individual experiences increased burning sensation after the first washing. You can learn about the proper management of chemical burns by taking part in first aid training today. The training provided will keep you prepared for accidental exposure to chemicals at home or in the workplace. As for severe cases, it is best to bring the individual to the emergency department at the nearest hospital as soon as possible.

Skin bleach burn

The primary treatment for a bleach burn is to flush the bleach off the skin using cool running water. You have to continue this for about 20 minutes or more.

Relief from pain

When dealing with a bleach burn, you can relieve the pain in various ways. Initially, you can apply a cold, wet compress over the burned area. You can also provide the individual with over-the-counter pain medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, acetaminophen or naproxen. On the other hand, if the victim is younger than 2 years old, do not provide aspirin. You have to consult a doctor first if the victim is a child.

In case the burn victim is a child or teenager who is currently recovering from flu-like symptoms or chickenpox, aspirin should not be given as well. If the pain could not be managed with over-the-counter pain medications, it is best to seek medical care.

Further treatment

The bleach burn should also be covered with sterile, dry dressing or a clean cloth in order to protect the affected area from friction. When it comes to minor bleach burns, they are likely to heal without requiring further treatment. Just make sure to avoid applying any salves or ointments on the affected area since it might increase the risk for infection and do not attempt to remove the dead skin or blisters from the burned area.

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