Potential reasons why mid-abdominal pain occurs

Mid-abdominal pain can arise for various reasons. Various bodily systems and organs occupy the interior or close to the abdomen, thus determining the precise cause of the pain can be a challenge.

The possible causes of mid-abdominal pain usually include dysfunction issues with the gallbladder, heart, stomach, pancreas, colon, blood vessels, kidney or reproductive organs. Some conditions that can trigger pain might resolve on their own. On the other hand, others are serious and require immediate medical care.

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis involves inflammation of the stomach and the intestines which is often triggered by a virus that leads to cramp-like pain in the upper and middle region of the abdomen.

The other symptoms that can occur include nausea, watery diarrhea, fever and vomiting. The virus responsible for the condition can be acquired by being exposed to an infected individual, food or while travelling. Remember that severe diarrhea can lead to dehydration.

Mid-abdominal pain

Gastroenteritis involves inflammation of the stomach and the intestines which is often triggered by a virus that leads to cramp-like pain in the upper and middle region of the abdomen.

Peptic ulcer

A peptic ulcer causes erosion of the stomach tissue or small intestine. The ulcers usually cause a burning or gnawing pain in the middle region of the abdomen. This mid-abdominal pain subsides after eating but can recur within a few hours later or at night time.

The management of ulcers can help avoid any complications which might include blood-streaked stools, vomiting blood, dizziness, weakness and thirst. The ulcers can also lead to the perforation of the stomach which causes intense mid-abdominal pain up to the back and requires medical attention. There are certain types of ulcers that increases the risk for developing stomach cancer. The major risk factors for peptic ulcers include smoking and using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Abdominal aortic aneurysm

An aneurysm develops once a section of the aorta is weakened which results to a protrusion in the wall. The aneurysms can occur on any part throughout the aorta but most likely in the abdomen.

Most cases are small and grow at a slow rate which does not trigger any issues. Nevertheless, a large-sized, rapidly growing aneurysm can rupture which can lead to life-threatening bleeding. An abdominal aortic aneurysm will not trigger any symptoms, but if it does, it can be experienced as a pulsating sensation in the middle region of the stomach close to the navel. In some cases, there is additional pain in the abdomen, back or chest especially if pressure is applied.

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