Do I have pecan allergy?

Pecan allergy can trigger undesirable symptoms among sensitive individuals. If an individual has the allergy, the immune system responds to the proteins by triggering symptoms such as vomiting, hives, throat swelling, shortness of breath and dizziness.

Food allergy is likely to affect young children than adults. Even though children can outgrow most allergies, allergies to tree nuts and peanuts is less likely to be outgrown and settles in only 20% of cases.

What are the usual reactions?

The indications of pecan allergy can range from minor to life-threatening. The symptoms generally arise in an hour of ingesting pecan or any food that includes pecans.

The usual indications include the following:

pecan-allergy

If unintentional exposure occurs, an antihistamine and injectable epinephrine can be given to counteract the reaction and lessen the symptoms.

  • Swelling
  • Hives
  • Itchiness
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Shortness of breath
  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of consciousness

It is vital to note that not all these symptoms are present in a reaction and some only have skin symptoms such as swelling or hives. Remember that the minor skin symptoms might progress to systemic indications.

Management of pecan allergy

If unintentional exposure occurs, an antihistamine and injectable epinephrine can be given to counteract the reaction and lessen the symptoms.

An individual with pecan allergy must have these medications on hand always. During a reaction, the individual should be taken to the nearest emergency department even if the symptoms improved with available treatment.

Even though epinephrine can reverse the symptoms briefly, some individuals develop symptoms once it wears off. The individual should have a medical bracelet that shows information about the allergy in case of an emergency.

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