What is leaky gut syndrome?

Leaky gut syndrome is believed to cause a variety of long-term conditions including multiple sclerosis and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Various symptoms and conditions are brought about by the response of the immune system to toxins, germs or other substances that have been absorbed into the bloodstream via a leaky or porous bowel.

Even though it is accurate that certain ailments and drugs can lead to a “leaky” gut, there is limited proof to back up the concept that a permeable bowel is the main root of any serious or widespread issues.

What are the causes?

The interior of the bowel is coated by a single sheet of cells which comprises the mucosal wall. This barrier is efficient in taking in nutrients but stops most of the large-sized molecules and microorganisms from moving from the interior of the bowel into the bloodstream that can possibly result to widespread symptoms.

leaky gut syndrome

Aspirin, alcohol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including ibuprofen can irritate the lining of the bowel.

In some cases, the barrier might become inefficient and “leaky” but this is not generally enough to trigger serious issues.

Alcohol and some pain medications

Aspirin, alcohol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including ibuprofen can irritate the lining of the bowel. This can lead to damage to the seals amidst the cells, thus enabling some substances to move via the openings and into the bloodstream.

Certain conditions and treatments

The following can also impair the seals in the coating of the bowel:

  • Celiac disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease such as Crohn’s disease
  • Intestinal infections such as norovirus, salmonella and giardiasis
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Sepsis
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Chemotherapy drugs
  • Immunosuppressants
  • Radiotherapy to the abdominal region

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